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Elizabeth Cady Stanton Posters, Books, Video, Links for Learning
for the literature and social studies classrooms and home schoolers.


social studies > ELIZABETH CADY STANTON < notable activists < famous women


Women's Suffrage Leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Photographic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
Photographic Print

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
b. 11-12-1815; Johnstown, NY
d. 10-26-1902

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement.

Suffragists poster Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony
Suffragists-
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
& Susan B. Anthony

“Men their rights
and nothing more; women their rights
and nothing less.”
The motto of
Stanton and Anthony's newspaper, The Revolution, 1868.

Elizabeth's father was a lawyer, elected to Congress, and a judge whose occupations provided a legal understanding for his daughter's activism; her mother was the daughter of James Livingston, who served in the Revolutionary War. She received a formal education, unusual for the time, attending the school founded by Emma Willard.

Elizabeth married Henry Stanton, a friend of her cousin Garrit Smith, in 1840; she had the words “promise to obey” removed from the wedding vows. The Stanton's shared abolitionists view though he never supported women's suffrage.

Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized woman's rights and woman's suffrage movements in the United States.

In 1851 Elizabeth Cady Stanton met Susan B. Anthony another vocal supporter of women's rights, and the two women often worked together for women's right to vote. In 1869 they formed the National Woman Suffrage Association and from 1868 to 1870 they published The Revolution, a weekly newspaper that demanded equal rights for women.



ELIZABETH CADY STANTON POSTERS
Women's History Posters

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, halftone repr. of 1851 wood engr.; full, standing, in bloomer costume, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton in bloomer costume, 1851, Historic Print

Eighty Years and More, Title Page & Fontis, Historic Print
Eighty Years and More, Title Page & Fontis, Historic Print


Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1854, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1854, Historic Print

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Giclee Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Giclee Print

Henry Brewster Stanton and Elizabeth Cady, married on May 1, 1840, had seven children.

Henry Stanton, Historic Print
Henry Stanton,
Historic Print


Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
Historic Print

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
Historic Print


Elizabeth Cady Stanton with her sons, Daniel & Henry, 1848, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton with her sons,
Daniel & Henry, 1848,
Historic Print

Elizabeth Cady Stanton with daughters, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton with daughters,
Historic Print

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her daughter, Harriot--from a daguerreotype 1856, Historic Print
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her daughter, Harriot--from a daguerreotype 1856, Historic Print

Harriot Stanton Blatch, Historic Print
Harriot Stanton Blatch, c. 1900-1910,
Historic Print

Mrs. H.S. Blatch, Historic Print
Mrs. H.S. Blatch
Historic Print

Mrs. H.S. Blatch [between 1905 and 1917], Historic Print
Mrs. H.S. Blatch [between 1905
and 1917],
Historic Print

Nora Stanton Blatch DeForest Barney, Historic Print
Nora Stanton Blatch DeForest Barney, Historic Print

ECS granddaugther

Mrs. H.S. Blatch, Historic Print
Mrs. H.S. Blatch
Historic Print

In the days of Old Dobbin" and Derby hats Mrs. Harriot Stanton Blatch exhorted the Wall Street Crowds, Historic Print
Mrs. Harriot Stanton Blatch exhorted
Wall Street Crowds,
Historic Print

Suffragette headquarters, 32 Union Square, NYC., Mrs. Harriot Blatch, Historic Print
Suffragette headquarters,
32 Union Square, NYC., Mrs. Harriot Blatch,
Historic Print


Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Pioneers of Women's Rights Poster Series
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Pioneer of Women's Rights Poster Series

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

“Let woman live as she should. ...Let her know that her spirit is fitted for as high a sphere as man’s, and that her soul requires food as pure and exalted as his.”

One of the most famous leaders of the women's rights movement, Elizabeth Cady Stanton spent much of her life working to improve women's place in society. Intelligent and strong-willed, Stanton was a fluent writer and a powerful public speaker. In 1848, she and Lucretia Mott organized the first women's rights convention. It was held in Stanton's hometown: Seneca Falls, New York. Stanton wrote a “Declaration of Sentiment” for the meeting. Based on the Declaration of Independence, this document called for women to be treated as men's equals. The most controversial point in the Declaration was the demand for women's suffrage, or women's right to vote. In 1851, Stanton met Susan B. Anthony. Two worked closely together and remained good friends for the rest of their lives. Their work was rewarded when the Married Women's Property law of 1860 was passed in New York. This law said a maried woman – not her husband – was in control of both her property and the money she earned. It became a model for similar laws in other states. In 1869, Stanton and Anthony broke from other women's rights activists and founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, with the goal of gaining the right to vote. From 1868 to 1870 they also published a newspaper called The Revolution. Stanton was the main writer and she used the paper to broadcast her strong views on women's rights. In 1890, Stanton and Anthony's group rejoined the other major women's organization and formed the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Stanton was the group's first president. Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902 at age 86, 18 years before her dream of women's suffrage came true. Congress finally approved the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing women the right ot vote, in 1920.

• more Women’s Rights Movement posters


“Self-development is a higher duty than self-sacrifice.”
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
b. 11-12-1815; Johnstown, NY
d. 10-26-1902


• ELIZABETH CADY STANTON BOOKS, VHS, DVD

Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences 1815 -1897 by Elizabeth Cady Stanton - This vivid autobiography by one of the leaders in the fight for woman suffrage is a stirring depiction of the early struggles of American women toward equality. The new introduction and afterword written for the revised edition interpret Elizabeth Cady Stanton's positions and strategies for today's readers, detail the significance of the autobiography and situate it within the body of Stanton's writings and activities, bring current scholarship to the appraisal of her importance, and reflect on the last part of her life.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton writes about her life from childhood into her eighties. She recalls the discontent that led her to launch the woman suffrage movement at Seneca Falls in 1848 and the frustration of still having no voice in her own government after a half century of hard work.
In lively and opinionated prose, Stanton conveys all the passion that made her a guiding force in the women's movement. She provides an affectionate picture of her friend and political partner, Susan B. Anthony, and other leaders in the abolitionist and woman suffrage movements. She describes the immeasurable pleasure of winning converts to her cause and the satisfaction of silencing opponents through the force of her argument.
Sometimes humorous, sometimes touching, filled with resolve throughout, Eighty Years and More is a compelling portrait of this remarkable leader.

In Her Own Right: The Life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton by Elisabeth Griffith - The first comprehensive, fully documented biography of the most important woman suffragist and feminist reformer in nineteenth-century America, In Her Own Right restores Elizabeth Cady Stanton to her true place in history. Griffith emphasizes the significance of role models and female friendships in Stanton's progress toward personal and political independence. In Her Own Right is, in the author's words, an “unabashedly ‘great woman’ biography.”

Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony: An Illustrated History by Geoffrey C. Ward, et al - Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were two heroic women who vastly bettered the lives of a majority of American citizens. For more than fifty years they led the public battle to secure for women the most basic civil rights and helped establish a movement that would revolutionize American society. Yet despite the importance of their work and they impact they made on our history, a century and a half later, they have been almost forgotten.
Stanton and Anthony were close friends, partners, and allies, but judging from their backgrounds they would seem an unlikely pair. Stanton was born into the prominent Livingston clan in New York, grew up wealthy, educated, and sociable, married and had a large family of her own. Anthony, raised in a devout Quaker environment, worked to support herself her whole life, elected to remain single, and devoted herself to progressive causes, initially Temperance, then Abolition. They were nearly total opposites in their personalities and attributes, yet complemented each other's strengths perfectly. Stanton was a gifted writer and radical thinker, full of fervor and radical ideas but pinned down by her reponsibilities as wife and mother, while Anthony, a tireless and single-minded tactician, was eager for action, undaunted by the terrible difficulties she faced. As Stanton put it, “I forged the thunderbolts, she fired them.”
The relationship between these two extraordinary women and its effect on the development of the suffrage movement are richly depicted by Ward and Burns, and in the accompanying essays by Ellen Carol Dubois, Ann D. Gordon, and Martha Saxton. We also see Stanton and Anthony's interactions with major figures of the time, from from Frederick Douglass and John Brown to Lucretia Mott and Victoria Woodhull. Enhanced by a wonderful array of black-and-white and color illustrations, Not For Ourselves Alone is a vivid and inspiring portrait of two of the most fascinating, and important, characters in American history.
Also in VHS & DVD (1999)

The Woman's Bible: A Classic Feminist Perspective by Elizabeth Cady Stanton - The publication of The Woman's Bible in 1895 and 1898 represented the feminist pioneer's last strike at the roots of the ideology behind her gender's subordinate role in society. In keeping with her characteristic radical individualism, Stanton attacks religious orthodoxy on a political rather than scholarly basis. This clarion call to action consists of a book-by-book examination of the Bible, placing events in their historical context, interpreting passages as both allegory and fact, and comparing them with the myths of other cultures. It endures as an extraordinary document because of the questions it addresses, the topics it covers, and its still-resonant sincerity. Unabridged republication of the classic two-volume edition of 1895 and 1898.

Solitude of Self by Elizabeth Cady Stanton - Beautifully bound address before the US Senate Committee on Woman Suffrage, February 20, 1892
(Read online)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Photo-Illustrated Biography - A brief biography of the staunch supporter of women's rights who helped plan the historic Woman's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. Ages 4-8


LINKS FOR LEARNING : ELIZABETH CADY STANTON


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