HEALTH/SPIRITUALITY

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CALENDARS

Herb Gardens Calendars
Herb Gardens Calendars

Organic Gardening Calendars
Organic Gardening Calendars




BOOKS

Food: Your Miracle Medicine
Food: Your
Miracle Medicine


Food As Medicine: How to Use Diet, Vitamins, Juices, and Herbs for a Healthier, Happier, and Longer Life
Food As Medicine: How to Use Diet, Vitamins, Juices,
and Herbs for a Healthier, Happier, and Longer Life


Medicinal Plants of the World: An Illustrated Scientific Guide to Important Medicinal Plants and Their Uses
Medicinal Plants
of the World:
An Illustrated Scientific Guide
to Important
Medicinal Plants
and Their Uses


The Emerald Forest DVD
The Emerald Forest
DVD




Teacher's Best - The Creative Process


Medicinal Plants Educational Posters, Art Prints & Charts
for classrooms, home schoolers, offices.


social studies > health > nutrition > MEDICINAL < food < botany < science


Medicinal plants are defined as those with “health-promoting characteristics, temporary relief or symptomatic problems or has curative properties”, and are generally associated with traditional cultures.

Many modern day drugs: aspirin, digitalis, opium, and quinine - are based on medicinal plants.


“Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food.”
Hippocrates, Greek physician, known as father of modern scientific medicine 

• “Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine.” ~ Lord Byron

• “No medicine cures what happiness cannot.” ~ Gabriel Garcia Marquez



Medicinal Plants Chart Fine Art Print

Medicinal Plants
Chart Art Print

Herbal Remedies for Common Ailments Wall Chart
Herbal Remedies for Common Ailments
Wall Chart
botany posters
herbs posters

Mandrake, from a Treatise by Dioscorides, Giclee Print
Mandrake, from a
Treatise by Dioscorides,
Giclee Print

Mandrake, the common name of the plant that has parsley shaped roots that often branch into the shape of a human figure (male and female), has long been attributed with magical powers.

The Mandrake grows natively in southern and central Europe, in lands around the Mediterranean Sea, and on Corsica. This illustration is from the Treatise by Dioscorides.

Making Medicines: A Brief History of Pharmacy and Pharmaceuticals


Medicinal Plants for the Theriac, from "Treatise of Theriac", Giclee Print
Medicinal Plants
for the Theriac,
from “Treatise
of Theriac”,
Giclee Print

A theriac was a medicinal of opium, viper and a number of other ingredients originally concocted as an antidote against snake venom. Later it became a panacea for all aliments and probably had a sediative effect.

FYI - Theriac and the English word treacle (any syrup resulting from refining sugar and usually used as a sweetener or condiment in cooking) are derived from the same Greek root word theriaka. Careful readers (and trivia aficionados) will recognize a “treacle well” from Alice in Wonderland, and treacle tarts from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Harry Potter.


Cinchona from 'Phytographie Medicale' by Joseph Roques, Published in 1821, Giclee Print
Cinchona from 'Phytographie Medicale'
by Joseph Roques, Published in 1821,
Giclee Print

Cinchona, the source of quinine used to treat malaria, grows in the Andes Mountains of South America.

Malaria, for which there is evidence that it has been with humanity for 50,000 years, is a common, widespread vector-borne infectious disease is transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitos. The symptons, anemia, fever, and chills, are experienced by 515 million people annually, and responsible for killing between 1 and 3 million people a year.

The word malaria is from the Italian - “mal” (bad) + “aria” (air), it is also known as ague and marsh fever, as it was associated with swampy areas that were prime breeding grounds for mosquitos.

Dr. John Sappington of Arrow Rock, Missouri is regarded as the first doctor (1823) to “effectively use quinine for the treatment of malaria and fevers.”


Lemongrass, Photographic Print
Lemongrass,
Photographic Print

Lemongrass is a tall perennial grass native to warm temperate and the tropical regions of the Old World and Oceania.

Lemongrass is commonly used in teas, soups, and curries; lemongrass oil is a pesticide, and preservative with anti-fungal properties.

Lemongrass Products


Yarrow, Giclee Print
Yarrow,
Giclee Print

Yarrow, Achillea millefolium, has numerous qualities beneficial to humans despite being associated with war in flower lore.

Yarrow's reputation as a healing plant was recorded by Homer in The Iliad: Achilles gave yarrow salve to his soldiers to help stop the bleeding, and in the Middle Ages a carpenter could staunch blood flow with the plant grown just outside the door.

The Yarrow also combats erosion as it prefers poorly developed soils and tolerates drought, as well as attracting beneficial insects and repelling mosquitos.

In Chinese culture the yarrow stalks were used to throw the I Ching.

The Herbalist of Yarrow: A Fairy Tale of Plant Wisdom


Elizabeth Blackwell, Digitalis Purpurea, from "Herbarium Blackwellianum," 1757, Giclee Print
Digitalis Purpurea,
from "Herbarium Blackwellianum" 1757, Giclee Print

Elizabeth Blackwell, née Blachrie
b. 1700; Scotland
d. 1758

This is not the Elizabeth Blackwell who earned the first medical degree in the US. This Elizabeth Blackwell was among the first women to achieve fame as a botanical illustrator. As artist and engraver for the plates of A Curious Herbal, designed for physicians as a reference to medicinal plants, she bought her husband's release from debtors prison. (He was there because he squandered her dowry.)

women artists poster gallery


Plants from Culpeper's "English Physician and Complete Herbal," Published 1790, Giclee Print
Plants from Culpeper's "English Physician and Complete Herbal," Published 1790,
Giclee Print


Nicholas Culpeper
b. 10-18-1616; England
d. 1-10-1654; London - tuberculosis

Nicholas Culpeper, a physician and botanist whose systematic use of herbals was a key development in the evolution of modern pharmaceuticals, also translated Latin medical and herbal texts into vernacular English.

Culpeper's Complete Herbal
Heal Thyself: Nicholas Culpeper and the Seventeenth-Century Struggle to Bring Medicine to the People
Nicholas Culpeper, Herbalist of the People (online bio)


US 1993 Postal Stamps, Percy Lavon Julian
Percy Lavon Julian
US 1993 Postal Stamps

Percy Lavon Julian
b. 4-11-1899; Montgomery, AL
d. 4-19-1975; Illinois

Research chemist Percy Lavon Julian was a pioneer in the chemical synthesis of medicinal drugs from plants and during his lifetime he received more than 130 chemical patents.

He was one of the first African-Americans to earn a doctorate in chemistry (after St. Elmo Brady and Edward M. A. Chandler) and he also taught chemistry at the university level.


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